Life

Been Baking…

Bread pudding ( English).

Shortbread ( Scottish).

Marrying the English and Scottish cultures ~ as St Margaret of Scotland aimed to do….

Fun to spend some time baking today. Couldn’t find any helpers, everyone else was off, busy..but it was still a good way to spend some time this afternoon. Yes, I was tired and made some baking mistakes – but who’s to know?
I love cooking on feast days, cooking our way through the liturgical year. Yes, I am a hopeless cook but the activity and the idea is fun!
Tomorrow is St Elizabeth of Hungary . I am planning on putting Hungarian Goulash in the crockpot in the morning, ready to eat after work tomorrow night.
St. Elizabeth is remembered for her charitable works, especially for the establishment of hospitals. Today, dozens of hospitals and medical centers are named for her, several of them founded by the Sisters of St. Francis. Elizabeth lived at a time when the combined disasters of climate, war, pestilence, and poverty caused great suffering, and she became devoted to helping those who had nowhere to turn.
Elizabeth was born in Hungary in 1207. She began life as part of the Hungarian nobility, daughter of King Andrew II. At age 14, she married the 21-year-old Ludwig IV, of Thuringia (Germany). He was appointed regent of Meissen and the East Mark and who soon became employed by Holy Roman Emperor Frederick II as a soldier and diplomat.
Elizabeth was religious since her early years, and Ludwig supported her in this, including her acts of charity. While he was away for missions under Frederick II, Elizabeth took charge of local affairs and distributed alms in all parts of her husband’s territory.Ludwig died on one of his military campaigns, succumbing to illness not war wounds. Their third child was born shortly after his death.
Elizabeth then became associated with the Franciscans. They established their first settlement in the region in 1221 and she obtained spiritual instruction from them. The ideals of St. Francis appealed to her: chastity, humility, patience, prayer, and charity. Because of her royal position, the vow of poverty that Franciscans took was not easy to pursue and her retention of funds made the charitable work she pursued more fruitful; over time she distributed everything she had. It was with her financial aid and spiritual support that the Franciscans in 1225 founded a monastery in Eisenach. Conrad of Marburg, who had been held in high esteem by Ludwig, became her spiritual advisor. It is said that he treated Elizabeth with all the severity of his nature, for which he had a considerable reputation, but through this led her to new levels of sanctity and charity; after her death he was very active in her canonization.
On Good Friday, 1228, in the Franciscan house at Eisenach, Elizabeth formally renounced the world; she received from Conrad the dress of the Third Order of St. Francis. In the summer of 1228 she built the Franciscan hospital at Marburg and on its completion devoted herself entirely to the care of the sick, especially to those afflicted with debilitating and disfiguring diseases.
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6 thoughts on “Been Baking…”

  1. Well done, Leonie! I am always admiring your culinary accomplishments… you’ve given me an idea to make shortbread with Stephanie as we go through the Scottish studies…I’ve been looking into some other Scottish recipes too!

  2. Would you share your goulash crockpot recipe, pleeeease?? I have a great Hungarian Meatballs recipe for today that I’ve put on my blog, but I am yet to find a good goulash recipe! I love the look of the shortbread…so yum!

  3. 3 medium onions, chopped1 large green pepper, choppedOptional – 1/2 – 1 cup mushrooms, sliced4 cloves garlic, minced2 pounds steak cut into piecesI can tomatoes2 tablespoons tomato paste1/2 cup red wine3 tsp paprika¼ tsp black pepperSpray crock pot with non-stick cooking spray. Add all ingredients, mix well. Cover and cook on low for 7-8 hours or high 3-4 hours. Stir through sour cream before serving, if desired. Enjoy!

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